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Authors: Morgan Gould (Author's Institution); Alenka Burnik (Administrative Unit Jesenice); Gorazd Trpin (Author's Institution)
Published in: 1997
Length: 13 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This is the second of a two-case series (397-148-1 and 397-149-1). The immediate issue of the case is whether the ''Team'' will succeed in introducing change at the Siska Branch Office, and, by implication, whether such change is feasible in other branch offices deep in the administrative bureaucracy of the government of the Republic of Slovenia. The class participants should judge the long history of excessive bureaucratic rule and procedure under Tito''s federal socialist republic, and judge if and where change in the work culture is possible. The case can be addressed by beginning an analysis of the current strategic imperatives facing the government of the Republic of Slovenia. One can see that the strategic response - operational improvements - is inadequate to the strategic imperative: integration within the EU. This then leads into the introduction of the (B) case where the results are shown, and the case protagonists looks to the development of systems and norms.
Other setting(s):
1996

About

Abstract

This is the second of a two-case series (397-148-1 and 397-149-1). The immediate issue of the case is whether the ''Team'' will succeed in introducing change at the Siska Branch Office, and, by implication, whether such change is feasible in other branch offices deep in the administrative bureaucracy of the government of the Republic of Slovenia. The class participants should judge the long history of excessive bureaucratic rule and procedure under Tito''s federal socialist republic, and judge if and where change in the work culture is possible. The case can be addressed by beginning an analysis of the current strategic imperatives facing the government of the Republic of Slovenia. One can see that the strategic response - operational improvements - is inadequate to the strategic imperative: integration within the EU. This then leads into the introduction of the (B) case where the results are shown, and the case protagonists looks to the development of systems and norms.

Settings

Other setting(s):
1996

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