Product details

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Subject category: Marketing
Authors: Trichy Krishnan (Nyenrode Business Universiteit); Chet Borucki (Nyenrode Business Universiteit)
Published in: 1997

Abstract

This case is about the internationalisation process of Sanex, a household personal care product, that had a roaring success in Spain in spite of the fact that the company involved was a new entrant in the over-crowded and matured HPC market. The case brings out the complex interaction among the many factors that play a key role in the well known issue concerning the need to adapt a product to suit a new market: the role of the product champion, the critical nature of product positioning, the importance of top management''s commitment to the internationalisation process, the role of market research studies in new products, the inter-country organisational friction, and organisational learning. An interesting insight the reader would get out of the case is that any attempt made in adapting a product to suit some new requirements (say, of a country) may be counter-productive in the sense that it may alter the positioning of the product in the market, especially if the product is very delicately positioned. The case could be good material for both Marketing and International Business, and to some extent for Organisational Behaviour as well. A video (597-020-3) is available to accompany this case.
Location:
Other setting(s):
1993-1994

About

Abstract

This case is about the internationalisation process of Sanex, a household personal care product, that had a roaring success in Spain in spite of the fact that the company involved was a new entrant in the over-crowded and matured HPC market. The case brings out the complex interaction among the many factors that play a key role in the well known issue concerning the need to adapt a product to suit a new market: the role of the product champion, the critical nature of product positioning, the importance of top management''s commitment to the internationalisation process, the role of market research studies in new products, the inter-country organisational friction, and organisational learning. An interesting insight the reader would get out of the case is that any attempt made in adapting a product to suit some new requirements (say, of a country) may be counter-productive in the sense that it may alter the positioning of the product in the market, especially if the product is very delicately positioned. The case could be good material for both Marketing and International Business, and to some extent for Organisational Behaviour as well. A video (597-020-3) is available to accompany this case.

Settings

Location:
Other setting(s):
1993-1994

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