Product details

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Abstract

This case contains summaries of interviews with a number of representatives of the UK and Danish mohair production sectors. From the beginning, it attempts to establish the present opportunities facing the two sectors and the structures that are currently dictating the pathways through which mohair is supplied to the consumer. Danish growers are producing less mohair than the UK and yet appear to have a far more integrated channel of supply, targeting consumers through specific retail and mail-order outlets. By contrast the UK collects and assembles fibre centrally in order to sell to Bradford markets at world prices. If UK mohair production is to be sustained in the medium term, there needs to be a change of attitude, to encourage production, maintain quality and to provide a financially viable return to the grower. There are a number of environmental and cultural considerations which need to be addressed. The case analyses the difficulties facing EU fibre production and more specifically, mohair production. The case examines the influences of political, socio-cultural, technological and economic environments on alternative fibre production enterprises and invites participants to suggest improvements to the current UK supply chain. The case demonstrates the need for a multifactorial approach to management decision making, given the wide range of influences surrounding current producers. This is examined through the use of marketing analytical tools.
Size:
10% of global supply
Other setting(s):
1996-1997

About

Abstract

This case contains summaries of interviews with a number of representatives of the UK and Danish mohair production sectors. From the beginning, it attempts to establish the present opportunities facing the two sectors and the structures that are currently dictating the pathways through which mohair is supplied to the consumer. Danish growers are producing less mohair than the UK and yet appear to have a far more integrated channel of supply, targeting consumers through specific retail and mail-order outlets. By contrast the UK collects and assembles fibre centrally in order to sell to Bradford markets at world prices. If UK mohair production is to be sustained in the medium term, there needs to be a change of attitude, to encourage production, maintain quality and to provide a financially viable return to the grower. There are a number of environmental and cultural considerations which need to be addressed. The case analyses the difficulties facing EU fibre production and more specifically, mohair production. The case examines the influences of political, socio-cultural, technological and economic environments on alternative fibre production enterprises and invites participants to suggest improvements to the current UK supply chain. The case demonstrates the need for a multifactorial approach to management decision making, given the wide range of influences surrounding current producers. This is examined through the use of marketing analytical tools.

Settings

Size:
10% of global supply
Other setting(s):
1996-1997

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