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Authors: Martin Cloonan (The York Management School)
Published in: 1997
Length: 63 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

What are the prospects for socialist revolution in the Third World? This case explores the prospects for revolutionary change in the Third World by focusing on the origins, history, structure and politics of Sendero Luminoso in Peru. It situates the emergence and aims of this organisation in the context of the socio-economic and political history of Peru. It requires students to understand not only the particular history of Sendero in Peru, but also to seek to assess its prospects against the background of competing theories of revolution from Marx to Chalmers Johnson. The case would be ideally suited to courses on Latin American politics or politics in the developing world more generally, but it would also be of great interest to students of comparative politics or of revolutions and revolutionary politics. It is a long case and it is desirable that students read it twice before discussing it, and in order to do it justice it would be best as part of a two-hour seminar session or two one-hour sessions.

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Abstract

What are the prospects for socialist revolution in the Third World? This case explores the prospects for revolutionary change in the Third World by focusing on the origins, history, structure and politics of Sendero Luminoso in Peru. It situates the emergence and aims of this organisation in the context of the socio-economic and political history of Peru. It requires students to understand not only the particular history of Sendero in Peru, but also to seek to assess its prospects against the background of competing theories of revolution from Marx to Chalmers Johnson. The case would be ideally suited to courses on Latin American politics or politics in the developing world more generally, but it would also be of great interest to students of comparative politics or of revolutions and revolutionary politics. It is a long case and it is desirable that students read it twice before discussing it, and in order to do it justice it would be best as part of a two-hour seminar session or two one-hour sessions.

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