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Authors: Martin Cloonan (School for Business and Society, University of York)
Published in: 1997
Length: 39 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

When should Ministers resign? Using the 1996 Scott Report as its primary source, this case examines the constitutional position of Ministers in the United Kingdom system of government. It asks whether William Waldegrave should have resigned over his conduct in the "arms to Iraq" affair. In doing so, the whole issue of ministerial resignations is put under the spotlight. The case will be of great use for students of British politics in the modern era. In addition to raising questions about Ministerial resignations, it also explains many parts of the complex story of the Scott Report. The case could be taught for the duration of one or more seminars.

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Abstract

When should Ministers resign? Using the 1996 Scott Report as its primary source, this case examines the constitutional position of Ministers in the United Kingdom system of government. It asks whether William Waldegrave should have resigned over his conduct in the "arms to Iraq" affair. In doing so, the whole issue of ministerial resignations is put under the spotlight. The case will be of great use for students of British politics in the modern era. In addition to raising questions about Ministerial resignations, it also explains many parts of the complex story of the Scott Report. The case could be taught for the duration of one or more seminars.

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