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Authors: C Barrett (The York Management School)
Published in: 1997
Length: 32 pages

Abstract

What is "genocide"? What does the concept mean? What kind of mass killing does it include and what kind of mass killing does it exclude? When, where, why and how did the concept arise? How has it been used? And is it a useful concept? This case study explores the concept of genocide by outlining the events in Rwanda in the early 1990s and by assessing the various arguments used by different groups in seeking to define those activities as constituting genocide or not. This case study would be useful in courses on political philosophy, comparative politics and the methodology of the social sciences in that it seeks to focus on the ways in which concepts emerge, their contested nature, how they are used and the implications of their use for political analysis and political practice.

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Abstract

What is "genocide"? What does the concept mean? What kind of mass killing does it include and what kind of mass killing does it exclude? When, where, why and how did the concept arise? How has it been used? And is it a useful concept? This case study explores the concept of genocide by outlining the events in Rwanda in the early 1990s and by assessing the various arguments used by different groups in seeking to define those activities as constituting genocide or not. This case study would be useful in courses on political philosophy, comparative politics and the methodology of the social sciences in that it seeks to focus on the ways in which concepts emerge, their contested nature, how they are used and the implications of their use for political analysis and political practice.

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