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Authors: Martin Cloonan (The York Management School)
Published in: 1997
Length: 29 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

This case examines the Unites States'' invasion and occupation of the Caribbean island of Grenada in October 1983. It asks whether the invasion can be justified and, if so, on what grounds. In doing so, it examines such concepts as ''sovereignty'' and ''self-determination''. It ends by asking students whether states should adhere to these principles, even if that means endangering the lives of some of their citizens or tolerating gross abuses of the human rights of others. This case study would work well in courses on international relations, democratic theory and comparative politics. The material will sustain useful discussions for up to two hours.

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Abstract

This case examines the Unites States'' invasion and occupation of the Caribbean island of Grenada in October 1983. It asks whether the invasion can be justified and, if so, on what grounds. In doing so, it examines such concepts as ''sovereignty'' and ''self-determination''. It ends by asking students whether states should adhere to these principles, even if that means endangering the lives of some of their citizens or tolerating gross abuses of the human rights of others. This case study would work well in courses on international relations, democratic theory and comparative politics. The material will sustain useful discussions for up to two hours.

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