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Authors: Rehan Ul-Haq (Birmingham Business School); Mehmet Oktemgil (Birmingham Business School); John Burton (Birmingham Business School)
Published in: 2004

Abstract

In Porter (1980) a new ‘Five Forces of Competitive Advantage Model’ was presented and developed. The model provides a method of structuring the analysis of the five forces (the power of suppliers and buyers, the threat of new entrants and substitutes and the intensity of competition) acting on a particular industry. Changes in the generic dynamics of industries have increased the volatility of many an industry. Whilst Porter does acknowledge the need to consider collaboration issues, we suggest that the combination of the Porter (1980) ‘Five Forces of Competitive Advantage’ and the Burton (1995) ‘Five Sources of Collaborative Advantage’ (contracting and quasi-integration with suppliers, partnering with channel and buyers, prospective diversification alliance, alliance with compliments and substitutes, horizontal strategic alliances) would allow greater insights into possible strategies and increase the value of such an analysis to strategic leaders in firms, students and academics.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
EUR380 billion
Other setting(s):
2004

About

Abstract

In Porter (1980) a new ‘Five Forces of Competitive Advantage Model’ was presented and developed. The model provides a method of structuring the analysis of the five forces (the power of suppliers and buyers, the threat of new entrants and substitutes and the intensity of competition) acting on a particular industry. Changes in the generic dynamics of industries have increased the volatility of many an industry. Whilst Porter does acknowledge the need to consider collaboration issues, we suggest that the combination of the Porter (1980) ‘Five Forces of Competitive Advantage’ and the Burton (1995) ‘Five Sources of Collaborative Advantage’ (contracting and quasi-integration with suppliers, partnering with channel and buyers, prospective diversification alliance, alliance with compliments and substitutes, horizontal strategic alliances) would allow greater insights into possible strategies and increase the value of such an analysis to strategic leaders in firms, students and academics.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
EUR380 billion
Other setting(s):
2004

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