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Published by: Indiana University
Published in: "Business Horizons", 2002

Abstract

Part science, part art, decision making is one of an executive''s primary accountabilities. A firm''s success or failure relies heavily on the quality of the decisions its top managers make. Judging from these conversations and interviews with senior execs in high-tech companies, the decision-making process is, on average, noticeably more egalitarian than in traditional, hierarchical companies. In manufacturing operations, technical specifications drive the process; in service firms, customer behavior does. But in the high-tech world, the process is based on a group-aided or participative style, with a high tolerance for employee error.

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Abstract

Part science, part art, decision making is one of an executive''s primary accountabilities. A firm''s success or failure relies heavily on the quality of the decisions its top managers make. Judging from these conversations and interviews with senior execs in high-tech companies, the decision-making process is, on average, noticeably more egalitarian than in traditional, hierarchical companies. In manufacturing operations, technical specifications drive the process; in service firms, customer behavior does. But in the high-tech world, the process is based on a group-aided or participative style, with a high tolerance for employee error.

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