Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Management article
-
Reference no. C0201C
Authors: Martha Craumer
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Communication Letter", 2002
Length: 1 pages

Abstract

With the amount of time and effort your company spends on news releases, you would expect major media coverage. Yet, it seems your news rarely, if ever, gets picked up. Why? Editors and writers look for topics that are timely, relevant to their audiences, involve someone or something famous, make a personal connection, and are unusual. They don''t fall for thinly veiled marketing ploys, and they lose patience with lousy writing. In Why Your New Releases Aren''t Making News, learn how to critique your PR department''s releases and improve your company''s chances of getting media hits.

About

Abstract

With the amount of time and effort your company spends on news releases, you would expect major media coverage. Yet, it seems your news rarely, if ever, gets picked up. Why? Editors and writers look for topics that are timely, relevant to their audiences, involve someone or something famous, make a personal connection, and are unusual. They don''t fall for thinly veiled marketing ploys, and they lose patience with lousy writing. In Why Your New Releases Aren''t Making News, learn how to critique your PR department''s releases and improve your company''s chances of getting media hits.

Related