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Management article
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Reference no. C0107E
Authors: Dianna Hand
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Communication Letter", 2001

Abstract

Bullying behavior is not limited to schoolyards and sports teams. For many people, bullying is very much a part of their work life. According to a University of North Carolina study, 53% of respondents reported lowered productivity as a result of bullying and other negative behavior, 28% lost work time avoiding the instigator, nearly 25% reduced their effort at work, and 12% actually quit. Unfortunately, you can''t expect to change a bully, but there are steps you can take to minimize the effects of bullying behavior in the workplace. HMCL turns to psychologists and legal experts for some guidelines.

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Abstract

Bullying behavior is not limited to schoolyards and sports teams. For many people, bullying is very much a part of their work life. According to a University of North Carolina study, 53% of respondents reported lowered productivity as a result of bullying and other negative behavior, 28% lost work time avoiding the instigator, nearly 25% reduced their effort at work, and 12% actually quit. Unfortunately, you can''t expect to change a bully, but there are steps you can take to minimize the effects of bullying behavior in the workplace. HMCL turns to psychologists and legal experts for some guidelines.

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