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Management article
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Reference no. C0103B
Authors: Mary Munter
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Communication Letter", 2001

Abstract

Having an audience strategy--that is, techniques for analyzing your various audiences and gearing your communications towards their needs and interests--is essential to successful communication. A well-crafted memo is useless if the recipient only responds to e-mail or voicemail. And an audience of senior managers can get turned off by a funding request weighed down with technical jargon. By asking yourself four questions about the people you need to address--who are they, what do they know, what do they feel, and what motivates them--your communications stand a much better chance of getting through to the right people in the right way.

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Abstract

Having an audience strategy--that is, techniques for analyzing your various audiences and gearing your communications towards their needs and interests--is essential to successful communication. A well-crafted memo is useless if the recipient only responds to e-mail or voicemail. And an audience of senior managers can get turned off by a funding request weighed down with technical jargon. By asking yourself four questions about the people you need to address--who are they, what do they know, what do they feel, and what motivates them--your communications stand a much better chance of getting through to the right people in the right way.

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