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Management article
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Reference no. C0105B
Authors: John Clayton
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Communication Letter", 2001
Length: 2 pages

Abstract

Capturing your ideas on paper and making them comprehensible to others are two separate tasks. The trick is knowing when to do what. In this article, writer John Clayton argues that the initial stages of writing should be like brainstorming: fast and uncritical. Just let the ideas come out in whatever form they choose, without worrying about word choice or grammatical rules. Editing and polishing happens in separate, later drafts. Drawing on the work of writing teacher Peter Elbow, Clayton provides techniques for turning off your internal editor while writing, and--once you''ve got it all on paper--tips for catching all the errors you made through careful editing and proofing.

About

Abstract

Capturing your ideas on paper and making them comprehensible to others are two separate tasks. The trick is knowing when to do what. In this article, writer John Clayton argues that the initial stages of writing should be like brainstorming: fast and uncritical. Just let the ideas come out in whatever form they choose, without worrying about word choice or grammatical rules. Editing and polishing happens in separate, later drafts. Drawing on the work of writing teacher Peter Elbow, Clayton provides techniques for turning off your internal editor while writing, and--once you''ve got it all on paper--tips for catching all the errors you made through careful editing and proofing.

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