Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Management article
-
Reference no. U9912A
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Update", 1999
Length: 2 pages

Abstract

Intrapreneurship isn''t exactly new--the concept of creating new businesses within large companies was briefly popular in the 1980s, but most companies soon became too concerned with reengineering and downsizing to look for new business opportunities. These days, however, intrapreneurship is back. Companies are leaner and are looking for ways to grow and to survive in an increasingly competitive marketplace. Intrapraneurship goes beyond the production of ideas to actually foster new ventures--and requires training and coaching, incentives, and buy-in from senior levels to ensure that new businesses can really emerge.

About

Abstract

Intrapreneurship isn''t exactly new--the concept of creating new businesses within large companies was briefly popular in the 1980s, but most companies soon became too concerned with reengineering and downsizing to look for new business opportunities. These days, however, intrapreneurship is back. Companies are leaner and are looking for ways to grow and to survive in an increasingly competitive marketplace. Intrapraneurship goes beyond the production of ideas to actually foster new ventures--and requires training and coaching, incentives, and buy-in from senior levels to ensure that new businesses can really emerge.

Related