Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Case
-
Reference no. 9-599-057
Subject category: Marketing
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: 1998
Length: 15 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

Danny Wegman, president of Wegmans Food markets, is trying to decide how to evaluate the success of a nutrition-counseling program for diabetics, and whether and how to expand the program beyond the two stores currently involved. Wegmans, with 57 stores and $2.3 billion in revenues, implemented the program in conjunction with a local hospital and a disease-management company. Initially intended to stem the erosion of pharmacy margins due to managed care plans, the program filled a genuine social need--diabetes can be inexpensively controlled through diet if caught early enough. In addition to discussing how the program has been established, the case presents financials for the supermarket industry and Wegmans'' competitors. The new role of supermarkets in addressing disease, health, and preventive medical needs is also presented.; To discuss the role of pharmacies in supermarkets, the changing view of health care as the domain of society as a whole, and methods for supermarkets to compete with supercenters, warehouses, and convenience stores. Also to introduce the issue of social benefits and the value of incidental purchases--while Wegmans may not make much money on the program itself, what impact does it have on shopper behavior and purchase patterns?

About

Abstract

Danny Wegman, president of Wegmans Food markets, is trying to decide how to evaluate the success of a nutrition-counseling program for diabetics, and whether and how to expand the program beyond the two stores currently involved. Wegmans, with 57 stores and $2.3 billion in revenues, implemented the program in conjunction with a local hospital and a disease-management company. Initially intended to stem the erosion of pharmacy margins due to managed care plans, the program filled a genuine social need--diabetes can be inexpensively controlled through diet if caught early enough. In addition to discussing how the program has been established, the case presents financials for the supermarket industry and Wegmans'' competitors. The new role of supermarkets in addressing disease, health, and preventive medical needs is also presented.; To discuss the role of pharmacies in supermarkets, the changing view of health care as the domain of society as a whole, and methods for supermarkets to compete with supercenters, warehouses, and convenience stores. Also to introduce the issue of social benefits and the value of incidental purchases--while Wegmans may not make much money on the program itself, what impact does it have on shopper behavior and purchase patterns?

Related