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Reference no. 9-898-205
Subject category: Entrepreneurship
Authors: Amar Bhide
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 1998
Version: 12 June 1998
Revision date: 05-Sep-2011
Length: 5 pages

Abstract

Presents the conclusions of a 1992 mail survey of Harvard MBAs who started their own businesses. Questions focused on 4 areas: (1) development of the business concept, (2) sales and marketing, (3) finance, and (4) building a staff. The entrepreneurs surveyed include 24 in consulting, 17 in professional services (most financial), and 46 in ‘traditional’ ventures ranging from farming to manufacturing to long-distance phone service. Throughout, the survey responses are directly compared with those from an earlier study of 100 entrepreneurs drawn from the ‘Inc 500’ list of fast-growing new businesses. Despite differences in the education and capital resources of the two groups, they are shown to be remarkably similar. Includes 82 exhibits and concludes with a summary of ‘travel tips’ for aspiring entrepreneurs. Points to skills, attitudes, and knowledge that will help students considering entrepreneurial careers. Also contains a wealth of data that can provide useful background information on virtually all the topics that a typical entrepreneurship course covers.

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Abstract

Presents the conclusions of a 1992 mail survey of Harvard MBAs who started their own businesses. Questions focused on 4 areas: (1) development of the business concept, (2) sales and marketing, (3) finance, and (4) building a staff. The entrepreneurs surveyed include 24 in consulting, 17 in professional services (most financial), and 46 in ‘traditional’ ventures ranging from farming to manufacturing to long-distance phone service. Throughout, the survey responses are directly compared with those from an earlier study of 100 entrepreneurs drawn from the ‘Inc 500’ list of fast-growing new businesses. Despite differences in the education and capital resources of the two groups, they are shown to be remarkably similar. Includes 82 exhibits and concludes with a summary of ‘travel tips’ for aspiring entrepreneurs. Points to skills, attitudes, and knowledge that will help students considering entrepreneurial careers. Also contains a wealth of data that can provide useful background information on virtually all the topics that a typical entrepreneurship course covers.

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