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Management article
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Reference no. U9701C
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Update", 1997

Abstract

In an interview with the heads of the MBA career-development program at Harvard Business School, career-planning guidance for the modern workplace is discussed. The interviewees maintain that most often one''s basic set of business interests is established in his or her 20s. Candidates are advised to take an inventory of interests, such as a test, and use the results to choose a career path. One common mistake is for people to make career decisions based on what they should do, what they can do, and their abilities, but not on their interests. Success will come from finding the work that consistently allows your interests to be realized, that will bring you out and present you with new frontiers. "Work opportunities," not jobs, "are the new focus of career planning-- employers are more likely to say, "We''ve got a project, you''ve got a skill set--when that''s done, maybe there will be other problems and maybe there won''t be." A new-style career is like surfing: constantly looking for the waves, checking the water--you''re going to get thrown a half- dozen times over the course of your life.

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Abstract

In an interview with the heads of the MBA career-development program at Harvard Business School, career-planning guidance for the modern workplace is discussed. The interviewees maintain that most often one''s basic set of business interests is established in his or her 20s. Candidates are advised to take an inventory of interests, such as a test, and use the results to choose a career path. One common mistake is for people to make career decisions based on what they should do, what they can do, and their abilities, but not on their interests. Success will come from finding the work that consistently allows your interests to be realized, that will bring you out and present you with new frontiers. "Work opportunities," not jobs, "are the new focus of career planning-- employers are more likely to say, "We''ve got a project, you''ve got a skill set--when that''s done, maybe there will be other problems and maybe there won''t be." A new-style career is like surfing: constantly looking for the waves, checking the water--you''re going to get thrown a half- dozen times over the course of your life.

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