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Management article
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Reference no. U9712A
Authors: John Case
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Management Update", 1997

Abstract

As companies struggle to implement "empowerment" programs to boost their productivity, one pitfall is that employees will strive to better only their individual performance or that of their team, ignoring the company''s overall goals. A solution to this dilemma is open-book management, which as the name implies, allows employees access to the financial records of the firm and simultaneously educates them to understand "the big picture." Techniques being used at Physician Sales and Service (PSS) and Springfield ReManufacturing (SRC) are profiled. Even if you lack the authority to determine who sees the key numbers, or don''t have access yourself, there are suggestions for applying these principles in closed-book organizations.

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Abstract

As companies struggle to implement "empowerment" programs to boost their productivity, one pitfall is that employees will strive to better only their individual performance or that of their team, ignoring the company''s overall goals. A solution to this dilemma is open-book management, which as the name implies, allows employees access to the financial records of the firm and simultaneously educates them to understand "the big picture." Techniques being used at Physician Sales and Service (PSS) and Springfield ReManufacturing (SRC) are profiled. Even if you lack the authority to determine who sees the key numbers, or don''t have access yourself, there are suggestions for applying these principles in closed-book organizations.

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