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Management article
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Reference no. 88504
Authors: John J Donovan
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1988

Abstract

The migration of computing power from corporate headquarters to divisions, plants, and desktops promises to reduce costs, enhance competitiveness, and renew creativity. In a world of accelerating decentralization, the most effective way to manage computer resources is to focus on the networks that connect them. To do this, chief information officers must transform themselves into network managers. Network managers will relinquish control of hardware and software decisions and seize control of communication systems and policies. Their central challenge will be to devise customized solutions to the three levels of connectivity in a computer network--physical, systems, and applications-- that allow information to flow smoothly between applications and workstations.

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Abstract

The migration of computing power from corporate headquarters to divisions, plants, and desktops promises to reduce costs, enhance competitiveness, and renew creativity. In a world of accelerating decentralization, the most effective way to manage computer resources is to focus on the networks that connect them. To do this, chief information officers must transform themselves into network managers. Network managers will relinquish control of hardware and software decisions and seize control of communication systems and policies. Their central challenge will be to devise customized solutions to the three levels of connectivity in a computer network--physical, systems, and applications-- that allow information to flow smoothly between applications and workstations.

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