Product details

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Subject category: Marketing
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 1994
Version: 6 March 1995
Length: 13 pages

Abstract

Addresses the common mistakes made in new product development and launch. Many times customers'' and suppliers'' perceptions of the degree of product/market innovation do not match. One of them may view the innovations as a "breakthrough," but the other may view it only as an incremental improvement of an existing solution. Such a mismatch will inevitably lead to faculty commercialization. But even if the match is perfect, this note argues that breakthroughs and incremental new products require quite different new product development processes to enable commercial success.

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Abstract

Addresses the common mistakes made in new product development and launch. Many times customers'' and suppliers'' perceptions of the degree of product/market innovation do not match. One of them may view the innovations as a "breakthrough," but the other may view it only as an incremental improvement of an existing solution. Such a mismatch will inevitably lead to faculty commercialization. But even if the match is perfect, this note argues that breakthroughs and incremental new products require quite different new product development processes to enable commercial success.

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