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Management article
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Reference no. 89405
Authors: Tait Elder
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1989

Abstract

A business venture is a short-term phase of a long-term activity in which a project evolves into a self-sustaining business. The IBM PC was a venture; the Xerox Alto computer never made it out of R&D. In Blue Magic, James Chposky and Ted Leonsis detail how IBM deviated from its traditional practices to enter the personal computer business. In Fumbling the Future, Douglas K. Smith and Robert C. Alexander present an organization, Xerox, that had the right product but didn''t follow through.

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Abstract

A business venture is a short-term phase of a long-term activity in which a project evolves into a self-sustaining business. The IBM PC was a venture; the Xerox Alto computer never made it out of R&D. In Blue Magic, James Chposky and Ted Leonsis detail how IBM deviated from its traditional practices to enter the personal computer business. In Fumbling the Future, Douglas K. Smith and Robert C. Alexander present an organization, Xerox, that had the right product but didn''t follow through.

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