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Management article
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Reference no. 88606
Authors: Robert Kelley
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1988

Abstract

Leaders and followers are often the same people, since most managers have both bosses and subordinates. But while companies often nurture leadership skills, they ignore good followership skills. Four steps that can develop good followers are: 1) redefining followership and leadership roles as equal but different activities, 2) teaching the skills that make effective followers, 3) carrying out performance evaluation on the basis of followership capacities, and 4) building organizational structures (like leaderless groups and rotating leadership assignments) that encourage followership.

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Abstract

Leaders and followers are often the same people, since most managers have both bosses and subordinates. But while companies often nurture leadership skills, they ignore good followership skills. Four steps that can develop good followers are: 1) redefining followership and leadership roles as equal but different activities, 2) teaching the skills that make effective followers, 3) carrying out performance evaluation on the basis of followership capacities, and 4) building organizational structures (like leaderless groups and rotating leadership assignments) that encourage followership.

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