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Management article
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Reference no. 85308
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1985

Abstract

New managers need from 24 to 36 months before they can be said to have mastered their jobs. Research on 14 U.S. and European new managers, which included turnaround and normal situations, reveals that the taking-charge process involves five predictable stages of learning and action: taking hold, immersion, reshaping, consolidation, and refinement. Success depends on critical factors such as experience and special competence, management style, relationships with key people, and critical front-end work.

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Abstract

New managers need from 24 to 36 months before they can be said to have mastered their jobs. Research on 14 U.S. and European new managers, which included turnaround and normal situations, reveals that the taking-charge process involves five predictable stages of learning and action: taking hold, immersion, reshaping, consolidation, and refinement. Success depends on critical factors such as experience and special competence, management style, relationships with key people, and critical front-end work.

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