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Supplement
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Reference no. 9-387-022
Authors: David B Yoffie
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Originally published in: 1986
Version: 2 November 1988
Length: 20 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

As import penetration into the American footwear market reached 81% in 1986, B-W Footwear, along with all of its American competitors, was struggling. Supply lines were deteriorating, retailers and importers were gaining power, and the government had rejected two consecutive petitions for protection. Like all industries faced with comparative cost disadvantages in international competition, footwear firms such as B-W have to find new ways to compete. This case explores different survival strategies for managing comparative disadvantage.
Location:
Industry:
Size:
Small, USD30 million sales
Other setting(s):
1986

About

Abstract

As import penetration into the American footwear market reached 81% in 1986, B-W Footwear, along with all of its American competitors, was struggling. Supply lines were deteriorating, retailers and importers were gaining power, and the government had rejected two consecutive petitions for protection. Like all industries faced with comparative cost disadvantages in international competition, footwear firms such as B-W have to find new ways to compete. This case explores different survival strategies for managing comparative disadvantage.

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Size:
Small, USD30 million sales
Other setting(s):
1986

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