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Management article
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Reference no. 87309
Authors: R Reich
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1987
Length: 7 pages

Abstract

Two stories illustrate the American way of thinking about entrepreneurship. The first is the story of the entrepreneurial hero-- found in every story by Horatio Alger--who uses energy, effort, daring, and good luck to rise in the world. But the story has an unhappy ending. The second story holds more promise, focusing not on the individual but on the team, as in Tracy Kidder''s description of how a group of engineers pooled their talents to design a new computer. The differences between these two versions are profound. The first celebrates the individual and the second celebrates the group--even the organization.

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Abstract

Two stories illustrate the American way of thinking about entrepreneurship. The first is the story of the entrepreneurial hero-- found in every story by Horatio Alger--who uses energy, effort, daring, and good luck to rise in the world. But the story has an unhappy ending. The second story holds more promise, focusing not on the individual but on the team, as in Tracy Kidder''s description of how a group of engineers pooled their talents to design a new computer. The differences between these two versions are profound. The first celebrates the individual and the second celebrates the group--even the organization.

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