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Management article
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Reference no. 86504
Authors: J Daniel Couger
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1986

Abstract

Microcomputers are invading every corporate corner, but they have not come close to achieving their much ballyhooed promise. A recent study of 17 large companies that have implemented end-user computing shows that most make costly mistakes and suffer from high costs of having different machines, software, and maintenance contracts. The record of a happy minority of the 17 companies shows that successful end-user programs depend on the thought with which the system is constructed and controlled.

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Abstract

Microcomputers are invading every corporate corner, but they have not come close to achieving their much ballyhooed promise. A recent study of 17 large companies that have implemented end-user computing shows that most make costly mistakes and suffer from high costs of having different machines, software, and maintenance contracts. The record of a happy minority of the 17 companies shows that successful end-user programs depend on the thought with which the system is constructed and controlled.

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