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Management article
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Reference no. 85607
Authors: R J Hayes
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1985
Length: 9 pages

Abstract

Even as the notion of strategic planning has come to dominate business education and practice in the United States, manufacturing companies in this country often miss goals and lag behind foreign competitors. Under certain circumstances, the problem lies with the logic shaping the strategic planning process: establish ends, develop ways to attain them, and assemble the necessary means. A reverse logic--means-way-ends--may be more appropriate in a changing environment. A company can develop broad capabilities (means) and match these with technological and market opportunities as they arise (ways). A shared vision of what the company can become rather than a set of directions or controls provides the guiding force for such an organization.

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Abstract

Even as the notion of strategic planning has come to dominate business education and practice in the United States, manufacturing companies in this country often miss goals and lag behind foreign competitors. Under certain circumstances, the problem lies with the logic shaping the strategic planning process: establish ends, develop ways to attain them, and assemble the necessary means. A reverse logic--means-way-ends--may be more appropriate in a changing environment. A company can develop broad capabilities (means) and match these with technological and market opportunities as they arise (ways). A shared vision of what the company can become rather than a set of directions or controls provides the guiding force for such an organization.

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