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Management article
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Reference no. 81201
Authors: Liz Barnes
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1981

Abstract

A dangerous and self-defeating pattern develops when managers hold three simple assumptions that, in combination, prevent the formation of trust: important issues naturally fall into two opposing camps, exemplified by either/or thinking; hard data and facts are better than what appear to be soft ideas and speculation; and the world is a dangerous place requiring a person to adopt a position of pervasive mistrust to survive.

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Abstract

A dangerous and self-defeating pattern develops when managers hold three simple assumptions that, in combination, prevent the formation of trust: important issues naturally fall into two opposing camps, exemplified by either/or thinking; hard data and facts are better than what appear to be soft ideas and speculation; and the world is a dangerous place requiring a person to adopt a position of pervasive mistrust to survive.

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