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Management article
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Reference no. 80203
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1980

Abstract

A study of more than 2,000 male executives and their wives over a five year period indicates certain factors which affect the ability of executives to have meaningful private lives. On-the-job frustration, self- doubt, and unfinished business cause emotional spillover into private life. This spillover manifests itself through fatigue, tension, and worrying. Major causes include the problems of adapting to a new job, the lack of an appropriate fit between a person and his job, and career disappointments.

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Abstract

A study of more than 2,000 male executives and their wives over a five year period indicates certain factors which affect the ability of executives to have meaningful private lives. On-the-job frustration, self- doubt, and unfinished business cause emotional spillover into private life. This spillover manifests itself through fatigue, tension, and worrying. Major causes include the problems of adapting to a new job, the lack of an appropriate fit between a person and his job, and career disappointments.

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