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Management article
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Reference no. 79209
Authors: John F. Rockart
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1979
Length: 12 pages

Abstract

General managers and chief executive officers generally determine the information they need through four basic approaches: the by-product technique, the null approach, the key indicator system, and the total study process. A new approach, the Critical Success Factors (CFS) Method, focuses on individual managers and on each manager''s current hard and soft information needs. The four prime sources of critical success factors are the structure of the particular industry; the competitive strategy, industry position, and geographic location; environmental factors; and temporal factors. The CFS method is useful at each level of general management.

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Abstract

General managers and chief executive officers generally determine the information they need through four basic approaches: the by-product technique, the null approach, the key indicator system, and the total study process. A new approach, the Critical Success Factors (CFS) Method, focuses on individual managers and on each manager''s current hard and soft information needs. The four prime sources of critical success factors are the structure of the particular industry; the competitive strategy, industry position, and geographic location; environmental factors; and temporal factors. The CFS method is useful at each level of general management.

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