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Management article
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Reference no. 79403
Authors: Rosabeth Kanter
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1979

Abstract

Power, the critical element in managerial behavior, is representative of efficacy and capacity, as well as dominance and oppression. An individual''s power comes from his or her position in an organization and access to resources, information, and organizational support. Power positions allow job discretion, recognition, and task relevance. The more communication with superiors, peers, and subordinates, the more powerful the position is. Powerlessness is characteristic of task and routine oriented jobs. Managerial skills must be communicated to subordinates to ensure greater effectiveness in supervision. McKinsey Award Winner.

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Abstract

Power, the critical element in managerial behavior, is representative of efficacy and capacity, as well as dominance and oppression. An individual''s power comes from his or her position in an organization and access to resources, information, and organizational support. Power positions allow job discretion, recognition, and task relevance. The more communication with superiors, peers, and subordinates, the more powerful the position is. Powerlessness is characteristic of task and routine oriented jobs. Managerial skills must be communicated to subordinates to ensure greater effectiveness in supervision. McKinsey Award Winner.

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