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Management article
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Reference no. 77511
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1977
Length: 9 pages

Abstract

Every manufacturing company experiences conflict, often internecine, between its marketing and manufacturing functions. There is a strong likelihood of conflict in managing the marketing/manufacturing interface in eight areas: capacity planning and long-range sales forecasting; production scheduling and short-range sales forecasting; delivery and physical distribution; quality assurance; breadth of product line; cost control; new product introduction; and adjunct services.

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Abstract

Every manufacturing company experiences conflict, often internecine, between its marketing and manufacturing functions. There is a strong likelihood of conflict in managing the marketing/manufacturing interface in eight areas: capacity planning and long-range sales forecasting; production scheduling and short-range sales forecasting; delivery and physical distribution; quality assurance; breadth of product line; cost control; new product introduction; and adjunct services.

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