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Management article
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Reference no. 73106
Authors: Harry Levinson
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Harvard Business Review", 1973

Abstract

American management attempts to motivate employees through the carrot- and-stick approach. According to the Great Jackson Fallacy executives unconsciously envision themselves as manipulators and controllers, and their subordinates as jackasses chasing the carrot. This attitude can place severe strain on management/employee relations and lead to employee inefficiency and low productivity. Executives should change their attitudes toward subordinates in order to ensure effective job performance.

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Abstract

American management attempts to motivate employees through the carrot- and-stick approach. According to the Great Jackson Fallacy executives unconsciously envision themselves as manipulators and controllers, and their subordinates as jackasses chasing the carrot. This attitude can place severe strain on management/employee relations and lead to employee inefficiency and low productivity. Executives should change their attitudes toward subordinates in order to ensure effective job performance.

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