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Published by: Darden Business Publishing
Originally published in: 2004
Version: 3 September 2019
Revision date: 17-Sep-2019

Abstract

This case from a three-case series that explores competitive strategies in a mature industry within the context of the Asia-Pacific region and is appropriate for use in competitive dynamics, international business, or business strategy courses. The state-owned Port of Singapore Authority wanted to become the World's Port of Call. The port of Singapore was one the world's busiest and a model of efficiency and operational excellence. But, by the end of 2001, it had lost two key customers to an emerging competitor, the port of Tanjung Pelepas (PTP), in neighboring Malaysia. In 2002, the Chinese shipper COSCO Pacific was considering a shift to PTP. By 2003, the port of Singapore had laid off staff and tried to explain the reasons behind the layoffs.
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Abstract

This case from a three-case series that explores competitive strategies in a mature industry within the context of the Asia-Pacific region and is appropriate for use in competitive dynamics, international business, or business strategy courses. The state-owned Port of Singapore Authority wanted to become the World's Port of Call. The port of Singapore was one the world's busiest and a model of efficiency and operational excellence. But, by the end of 2001, it had lost two key customers to an emerging competitor, the port of Tanjung Pelepas (PTP), in neighboring Malaysia. In 2002, the Chinese shipper COSCO Pacific was considering a shift to PTP. By 2003, the port of Singapore had laid off staff and tried to explain the reasons behind the layoffs.

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