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Published by: University of California, Berkeley
Published in: "California Management Review", 1998

Abstract

One of the most effective avenues toward improvement is the process of internal benchmarking - identifying, sharing, and using the knowledge and ''best practices'' inside one''s organization. But the process can be tricky and time consuming because of obstacles such as ignorance about resources or others'' needs, a culture that values personal expertise more than knowledge sharing, and a lack of resources for implementation of best practices. This article explores how organizations conduct successful internal benchmarking, relating details ranging from requirements for successful transfer to lessons learned.

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Abstract

One of the most effective avenues toward improvement is the process of internal benchmarking - identifying, sharing, and using the knowledge and ''best practices'' inside one''s organization. But the process can be tricky and time consuming because of obstacles such as ignorance about resources or others'' needs, a culture that values personal expertise more than knowledge sharing, and a lack of resources for implementation of best practices. This article explores how organizations conduct successful internal benchmarking, relating details ranging from requirements for successful transfer to lessons learned.

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