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Case
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Reference no. 905-003-1
Authors: Bharat Rao (Polytechnic Institute of New York University); Bojan Angelov (Polytechnic Institute of New York University)
Published in: 2005

Abstract

This case describes the rise of Skype, a relatively new entrant in the Internet protocol (IP) telephony space. Using an innovative combination of voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) and peer-to-peer (P2P) networking technologies, Skype offered a superior and potentially disruptive range of services. The P2P- based VoIP software would provide audio quality equivalent to conventional phone lines. It could take various forms that differed in their functionality and feature offerings, such as instant messaging and communication tools, file-sharing utilities and distributed computing. Teaching objectives include: (1) understanding the nature of disruptive technologies; (2) creating value through an integration of two or more disruptive technologies; (3) promoting a start-up through viral marketing techniques; and (4) commercialising new services in a competitive business environment. This case can potentially be taught in courses on innovation management, marketing, and emerging technologies. The note was developed based on a graduate level class in marketing taught at Polytechnic University in New York. The teaching note was written by Bharat Rao.
Location:
Size:
50 employees
Other setting(s):
2004

About

Abstract

This case describes the rise of Skype, a relatively new entrant in the Internet protocol (IP) telephony space. Using an innovative combination of voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) and peer-to-peer (P2P) networking technologies, Skype offered a superior and potentially disruptive range of services. The P2P- based VoIP software would provide audio quality equivalent to conventional phone lines. It could take various forms that differed in their functionality and feature offerings, such as instant messaging and communication tools, file-sharing utilities and distributed computing. Teaching objectives include: (1) understanding the nature of disruptive technologies; (2) creating value through an integration of two or more disruptive technologies; (3) promoting a start-up through viral marketing techniques; and (4) commercialising new services in a competitive business environment. This case can potentially be taught in courses on innovation management, marketing, and emerging technologies. The note was developed based on a graduate level class in marketing taught at Polytechnic University in New York. The teaching note was written by Bharat Rao.

Settings

Location:
Size:
50 employees
Other setting(s):
2004

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