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Management article
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Reference no. SMR46113
Authors: Johan Roos
Published by: MIT Sloan School of Management
Published in: "MIT Sloan Management Review", 2004
Length: 3 pages

Abstract

Over the course of the past two decades, it has become increasinglyand abundantly clear that companies must find ways to be more innovative, more flexible and better prepared. Yet despite a steady supply of new jargon, models and techniques, the practices by which most companies create strategy have by and large not helped firms become more prepared for the unexpected. They remain mired in the mind-set of a very different and less complex competitive era. Strategy has been reduced to calculation and analysis, nearly devoid of the imaginative spark that could bring it to life. For the development and communication of strategy to become the inspired and inspiring process it must be, it is up to company leaders to alter their strategizing practices in three crucial, perhaps counterintuitive, ways: (1) be more subjective and less generic; (2) explore new ways to stimulate insights and communication; and (3) recognize that context matters.

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Abstract

Over the course of the past two decades, it has become increasinglyand abundantly clear that companies must find ways to be more innovative, more flexible and better prepared. Yet despite a steady supply of new jargon, models and techniques, the practices by which most companies create strategy have by and large not helped firms become more prepared for the unexpected. They remain mired in the mind-set of a very different and less complex competitive era. Strategy has been reduced to calculation and analysis, nearly devoid of the imaginative spark that could bring it to life. For the development and communication of strategy to become the inspired and inspiring process it must be, it is up to company leaders to alter their strategizing practices in three crucial, perhaps counterintuitive, ways: (1) be more subjective and less generic; (2) explore new ways to stimulate insights and communication; and (3) recognize that context matters.

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