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Management article
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Reference no. N0512A
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Negotiation Newsletter", 2005

Abstract

In all types of negotiations and across all phases of the process, people misrepresent or fail to tell the truth, posing a serious challenge for managers. Deceptive behavior can range from bluffing, an accepted part of the negotiation process, to taking advantage of ambiguity to outright misrepresentations. Negotiators can train themselves to detect the verbal, vocal, and behavioral cues that signal deception. But they can also reduce the odds of being deceived by using five proven tactics. Read more about how relationship building, your own behavior, and focus on the right details can reduce the use of deceptive tactics at the negotiating table.

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Abstract

In all types of negotiations and across all phases of the process, people misrepresent or fail to tell the truth, posing a serious challenge for managers. Deceptive behavior can range from bluffing, an accepted part of the negotiation process, to taking advantage of ambiguity to outright misrepresentations. Negotiators can train themselves to detect the verbal, vocal, and behavioral cues that signal deception. But they can also reduce the odds of being deceived by using five proven tactics. Read more about how relationship building, your own behavior, and focus on the right details can reduce the use of deceptive tactics at the negotiating table.

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