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Authors: Chris F Kemerer
Published by: MIT Sloan School of Management
Published in: "MIT Sloan Management Review", 1993
Length: 20 pages

Abstract

Software development, so critical to the effective use of information technology, is poorly understood and managed. Numerous software engineering process innovations have been proposed to improve software development, the latest of which is object orientation. How can information systems managers decide whether to invest in such technologies? This paper proposes a general two-dimensional framework based on theories about organizational and communitywide innovations, and it accurately describes their adoption trajectories. Then they apply it to object orientation and take the controversial position that this new technology is not likely to be quickly adopted by large in-house business information systems groups.

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Abstract

Software development, so critical to the effective use of information technology, is poorly understood and managed. Numerous software engineering process innovations have been proposed to improve software development, the latest of which is object orientation. How can information systems managers decide whether to invest in such technologies? This paper proposes a general two-dimensional framework based on theories about organizational and communitywide innovations, and it accurately describes their adoption trajectories. Then they apply it to object orientation and take the controversial position that this new technology is not likely to be quickly adopted by large in-house business information systems groups.

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