Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Case
-
Reference no. 305-609-1
Authors: Darren Charters (University of Waterloo); Sally Gunz (University of Waterloo); John McCutcheon (Wilfrid Laurier University)
Published in: 2005
Length: 7 pages
Data source: Generalised experience

Abstract

This is the second of a two case series (305-608-1 and 305-609-1). This case has two primary focuses: (1) the impact of the Patriot Act on non-US businesses and the response of other jurisdictions to the legislation; and (2) the impact of intellectual property law in an international context and, in particular, one where business is conducted electronically. The case is designed for senior business students and is appropriate for use in strategy, international business or business law courses. There are two versions of the case. Version (A) includes excerpts of various pieces of legislation which students will need to interpret, whilst in version (B), the relevant legislation is summarised for the students. Version (A) is likely to be most appropriate for use in business law classes. The case is presented with a detailed teaching note. This case was sponsored by the Indiana University CIBER Case Collection.
Size:
Regional, international credit unions
Other setting(s):
2004

About

Abstract

This is the second of a two case series (305-608-1 and 305-609-1). This case has two primary focuses: (1) the impact of the Patriot Act on non-US businesses and the response of other jurisdictions to the legislation; and (2) the impact of intellectual property law in an international context and, in particular, one where business is conducted electronically. The case is designed for senior business students and is appropriate for use in strategy, international business or business law courses. There are two versions of the case. Version (A) includes excerpts of various pieces of legislation which students will need to interpret, whilst in version (B), the relevant legislation is summarised for the students. Version (A) is likely to be most appropriate for use in business law classes. The case is presented with a detailed teaching note. This case was sponsored by the Indiana University CIBER Case Collection.

Settings

Size:
Regional, international credit unions
Other setting(s):
2004

Related