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Management article
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Reference no. N0602B
Authors: Elizabeth Mannix
Published by: Harvard Business Publishing
Published in: "Negotiation Newsletter", 2006

Abstract

Most negotiation advice focuses on dyads, or one-on-one bargaining. Multiparty negotiations, in which more than two people are bargaining on behalf of themselves or others, create many opportunities to generate value. But group negotiations are also highly complex, and three characteristics - complexity of information, formation of alliances, and tendency toward majority rule - can derail these potentially rewarding relationships. Read this article for guidance on how to manage these areas to find creative, lasting agreements.

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Abstract

Most negotiation advice focuses on dyads, or one-on-one bargaining. Multiparty negotiations, in which more than two people are bargaining on behalf of themselves or others, create many opportunities to generate value. But group negotiations are also highly complex, and three characteristics - complexity of information, formation of alliances, and tendency toward majority rule - can derail these potentially rewarding relationships. Read this article for guidance on how to manage these areas to find creative, lasting agreements.

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