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Technical note
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Reference no. 9B06E002
Published by: Ivey Publishing
Originally published in: 2005
Version: 2005-12-12
Length: 12 pages
Data source: Published sources

Abstract

Use of streaming media; audio and video content delivered over an Internet Protocol (IP)-based network, was not as ubiquitous as e-mail, but was rapidly increasing. Workplace usage of streaming media hit 22 million users in October and November of 2001, increasing 11.3 per cent over the same period in the previous year. The users of streaming media were diverse. Enterprises used audio and video to jazz up their public-facing websites to improve the quality of on-line customer service, and to cut the costs of running a parallel closed-circuit television network for corporate communications and distance learning. Media and entertainment companies were aggressively pursuing the Internet as a distribution channel for movie trailers, and as an advertising channel to spur CD and DVD sales, and as a new revenue stream with pay-per-view delivery of entire films directly to a user''s computer. Despite the best efforts of technology and service providers, TN-quality streaming, and the business models that depended on it, streaming media still faced several hurdles. This technical note provides a high-level background on the challenges involved in delivering audio and video content over the Internet in 2001. It then gives an overview of various technical solutions that have been developed to address those challenges. It concludes with a discussion of the six critical areas that organizations must consider if they plan to include audio and video components in their business applications. This is a supplement to ''Mercedes-Benz USA: Investing in IT Infrastructure'', (9B06E003).
Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2001

About

Abstract

Use of streaming media; audio and video content delivered over an Internet Protocol (IP)-based network, was not as ubiquitous as e-mail, but was rapidly increasing. Workplace usage of streaming media hit 22 million users in October and November of 2001, increasing 11.3 per cent over the same period in the previous year. The users of streaming media were diverse. Enterprises used audio and video to jazz up their public-facing websites to improve the quality of on-line customer service, and to cut the costs of running a parallel closed-circuit television network for corporate communications and distance learning. Media and entertainment companies were aggressively pursuing the Internet as a distribution channel for movie trailers, and as an advertising channel to spur CD and DVD sales, and as a new revenue stream with pay-per-view delivery of entire films directly to a user''s computer. Despite the best efforts of technology and service providers, TN-quality streaming, and the business models that depended on it, streaming media still faced several hurdles. This technical note provides a high-level background on the challenges involved in delivering audio and video content over the Internet in 2001. It then gives an overview of various technical solutions that have been developed to address those challenges. It concludes with a discussion of the six critical areas that organizations must consider if they plan to include audio and video components in their business applications. This is a supplement to ''Mercedes-Benz USA: Investing in IT Infrastructure'', (9B06E003).

Settings

Location:
Industry:
Other setting(s):
2001

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