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Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1996
Length: 29 pages
Topics: Transportation

Abstract

Logan International Airport was the nation''s third most congested in 1993. Through vital to the entire New England economy, its expansion had long been blocked by opposition from nearby neighborhoods. Drawing on several recent studies, this case examines a wide range of alternatives for Logan congestion relief including high speed rail, the construction of a new short runway for commuter aircraft, runway congestion pricing, the development of new types of air service, construction of a new airport, and efforts to promote the growth of existing reliever airports. Students are invited to consider the strategies they would adopt if they occupied particular roles, such as executive director of the Massachusetts Port Authority (which owns and operates Logan), governor of Massachusetts, or US Secretary of Transportation.

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Abstract

Logan International Airport was the nation''s third most congested in 1993. Through vital to the entire New England economy, its expansion had long been blocked by opposition from nearby neighborhoods. Drawing on several recent studies, this case examines a wide range of alternatives for Logan congestion relief including high speed rail, the construction of a new short runway for commuter aircraft, runway congestion pricing, the development of new types of air service, construction of a new airport, and efforts to promote the growth of existing reliever airports. Students are invited to consider the strategies they would adopt if they occupied particular roles, such as executive director of the Massachusetts Port Authority (which owns and operates Logan), governor of Massachusetts, or US Secretary of Transportation.

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