Product details

By continuing to use our site you consent to the use of cookies as described in our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.
You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.
Case
-
Reference no. 506-214-1
Subject category: Marketing
Authors: Francis Buttle (Macquarie International, Macquarie University)
Published in: 2006

Abstract

Christiancare is a not-for-profit welfare organisation operating in Sydney, Australia. The case is largely concerned with the decision to implement customer relationship management (CRM). Senior management are divided about the necessity and scope of the implementation. Some feel that the organisation should not spend at all on CRM if that means that welfare services are curtailed. Others want to apply CRM to donor management; yet others want to apply CRM to all stakeholder relationships. The case shows how important it is to define the user groups and scope of a CRM project before commissioning work. It also illustrates the types of functionality that CRM systems can provide in the not-for-profit environment. The case provides details of a number of vendors'' offerings, and describes the charity''s donor management processes for different categories of donor. Issues of donor acquisition and donor retention are also explored. The case has a number of applications. It can be used to illustrate: (1) CRM implementations; (2) donor management; (3) management in not-for-profit organisations; (4) management of divergent stakeholder groups; and (5) information technology (IT) project implementation. The case can be used on marketing, service management, CRM, relationship marketing and not-for-profit management courses.
Location:
Size:
Medium
Other setting(s):
2001-2005

About

Abstract

Christiancare is a not-for-profit welfare organisation operating in Sydney, Australia. The case is largely concerned with the decision to implement customer relationship management (CRM). Senior management are divided about the necessity and scope of the implementation. Some feel that the organisation should not spend at all on CRM if that means that welfare services are curtailed. Others want to apply CRM to donor management; yet others want to apply CRM to all stakeholder relationships. The case shows how important it is to define the user groups and scope of a CRM project before commissioning work. It also illustrates the types of functionality that CRM systems can provide in the not-for-profit environment. The case provides details of a number of vendors'' offerings, and describes the charity''s donor management processes for different categories of donor. Issues of donor acquisition and donor retention are also explored. The case has a number of applications. It can be used to illustrate: (1) CRM implementations; (2) donor management; (3) management in not-for-profit organisations; (4) management of divergent stakeholder groups; and (5) information technology (IT) project implementation. The case can be used on marketing, service management, CRM, relationship marketing and not-for-profit management courses.

Settings

Location:
Size:
Medium
Other setting(s):
2001-2005

Related