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Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1996
Length: 20 pages

Abstract

This case recounts the difficult, on-the-ground issues which arise in the course of militarily-delivered humanitarian assistance to the African nation of Somalia in the wake of famine sparked by virtual dissolution of the central government. They contrast the approach of a United States led team and that led by the United Nations. They highlight the complexity of providing humanitarian assistance in a thoroughly unsettled political climate which requires negotiations among literally warring parties in order to achieve modest ends. The B case, in particular, describes the difficulties of US troops serving under United Nations command. This case is part of a series about US military interventions and negotiations against a backdrop of military threats. All are useful for those interested in negotiations theory, diplomacy and the politics of military interventions. See also Carrots, Sticks, and Question Marks: Negotiating the North Korean Nuclear Crisis (C18-95-1297.0 and 1298.0); and The Gulf Crisis: Building a Coalition for War (C16-94-1264.0).

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Abstract

This case recounts the difficult, on-the-ground issues which arise in the course of militarily-delivered humanitarian assistance to the African nation of Somalia in the wake of famine sparked by virtual dissolution of the central government. They contrast the approach of a United States led team and that led by the United Nations. They highlight the complexity of providing humanitarian assistance in a thoroughly unsettled political climate which requires negotiations among literally warring parties in order to achieve modest ends. The B case, in particular, describes the difficulties of US troops serving under United Nations command. This case is part of a series about US military interventions and negotiations against a backdrop of military threats. All are useful for those interested in negotiations theory, diplomacy and the politics of military interventions. See also Carrots, Sticks, and Question Marks: Negotiating the North Korean Nuclear Crisis (C18-95-1297.0 and 1298.0); and The Gulf Crisis: Building a Coalition for War (C16-94-1264.0).

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