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Case
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Reference no. HKS1150.0
Authors: Jillian Dickert
Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1992
Length: 22 pages

Abstract

When a sharp increase in drug use-keyed by the epidemic of "crack" cocaine-leads to public calls for the use of the military to halt drug imports, the Pentagon must decide whether and how it should respond to public demand for its intervention. The B case reveals the Pentagon''s decision to take on the drug war and invites scrutiny of the methods by which it chooses to wage its counter-offensive. The case allows for discussion of the broad theme of how and when public organizations should respond to demands that they, in effect, change the product that they offer, and of whether they should have the discretion to make such a decision.

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Abstract

When a sharp increase in drug use-keyed by the epidemic of "crack" cocaine-leads to public calls for the use of the military to halt drug imports, the Pentagon must decide whether and how it should respond to public demand for its intervention. The B case reveals the Pentagon''s decision to take on the drug war and invites scrutiny of the methods by which it chooses to wage its counter-offensive. The case allows for discussion of the broad theme of how and when public organizations should respond to demands that they, in effect, change the product that they offer, and of whether they should have the discretion to make such a decision.

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