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Authors: Marc Lindenberg
Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1991
Length: 38 pages

Abstract

This case provides an opportunity to evaluate a ten year World Bank effort to rebuild Uganda''s public sector institutional capacity after a costly civil war which culminated in the fall of Idi Amin in 1980. It helps focus on the linkage between successful policies for economic reform and streamlined, but strong, public institutions capable of designing and carrying out such policies.In the case students must set criteria to assess the program. Key issues which emerge are: the relative merits of investments in high-priced foreign advisors, the large proportion of total project funds which go to outside consulting firms, salary topping and incentive pay for ministry staff, the merits of foreign versus in-country training, and whether the donors benefit more than the recipients from these programs. The case can be used in two sessions if there is a desire to evaluate the overall economic recovery program as well.The teaching note provides background information on institutional capacity building and provides tips for using the case for evaluating institutional capacity building efforts in a first session and the economic recovery program in a second. A supplementary package of economic statistics is also available for those who want their students to assess the economic recovery program.

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Abstract

This case provides an opportunity to evaluate a ten year World Bank effort to rebuild Uganda''s public sector institutional capacity after a costly civil war which culminated in the fall of Idi Amin in 1980. It helps focus on the linkage between successful policies for economic reform and streamlined, but strong, public institutions capable of designing and carrying out such policies.In the case students must set criteria to assess the program. Key issues which emerge are: the relative merits of investments in high-priced foreign advisors, the large proportion of total project funds which go to outside consulting firms, salary topping and incentive pay for ministry staff, the merits of foreign versus in-country training, and whether the donors benefit more than the recipients from these programs. The case can be used in two sessions if there is a desire to evaluate the overall economic recovery program as well.The teaching note provides background information on institutional capacity building and provides tips for using the case for evaluating institutional capacity building efforts in a first session and the economic recovery program in a second. A supplementary package of economic statistics is also available for those who want their students to assess the economic recovery program.

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