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Compact case
Case
-
Reference no. IMD-3-1630
Published by: International Institute for Management Development (IMD)
Originally published in: 2006
Version: 13.11.2015
Revision date: 12-Jul-2016
Length: 3 pages
Data source: Field research

Abstract

This is part of a case series. The case describes an attempt by Steve Gundrum, the Chief Executive Officer and President of Mattson, to improve the company's innovativeness. Mattson, located in Silicon Valley, California, is an independent developer of new products for the food and beverage industry. Mattson creates, develops, and brings to market new beverages, snacks, frozen meals, and many other food and beverage products as a contractor to the large producers in the industry. Gundrum believes there's an opportunity to improve his innovation system by borrowing from the leading-edge software firms that surround him. To test new methods of developing products, Gundrum creates a contest - to develop a better cookie - and commissions three teams: one using Mattson's traditional hierarchical team structure, one using open source (OS) development, and a third using extreme programming (XP). The Mattson Project Delta (A), (B) and (C) cases explain what happened.
Location:
Size:
70+ employee-owners
Other setting(s):
2005

About

Abstract

This is part of a case series. The case describes an attempt by Steve Gundrum, the Chief Executive Officer and President of Mattson, to improve the company's innovativeness. Mattson, located in Silicon Valley, California, is an independent developer of new products for the food and beverage industry. Mattson creates, develops, and brings to market new beverages, snacks, frozen meals, and many other food and beverage products as a contractor to the large producers in the industry. Gundrum believes there's an opportunity to improve his innovation system by borrowing from the leading-edge software firms that surround him. To test new methods of developing products, Gundrum creates a contest - to develop a better cookie - and commissions three teams: one using Mattson's traditional hierarchical team structure, one using open source (OS) development, and a third using extreme programming (XP). The Mattson Project Delta (A), (B) and (C) cases explain what happened.

Settings

Location:
Size:
70+ employee-owners
Other setting(s):
2005

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