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Case
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Reference no. HKS0492.0
Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1983
Length: 21 pages
Notes: For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

On January 16, 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, outlawing the manufacture or sale of alcohol, became law. Its enactment was the product of a vigorous lobbying effort, using methods strikingly similar to those currently employed by Christian Political Action Committees. The story of the prohibitionist victory, therefore, is instructive to students of the legislative process - particularly of single-issue lobbying today. Part A chronicles the century-long effort of anti-liquor advocates to secure prohibition legislation, culminating in the victory of the Anti-Saloon League; it also analyzes the forces behind Prohibition's success. Part B briefly recounts the life and death of the Eighteenth Amendment. The supplement contains a number of recent articles on the Moral Majority and Christian Political Action Committees, to provide a point of analogy.

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Abstract

On January 16, 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, outlawing the manufacture or sale of alcohol, became law. Its enactment was the product of a vigorous lobbying effort, using methods strikingly similar to those currently employed by Christian Political Action Committees. The story of the prohibitionist victory, therefore, is instructive to students of the legislative process - particularly of single-issue lobbying today. Part A chronicles the century-long effort of anti-liquor advocates to secure prohibition legislation, culminating in the victory of the Anti-Saloon League; it also analyzes the forces behind Prohibition's success. Part B briefly recounts the life and death of the Eighteenth Amendment. The supplement contains a number of recent articles on the Moral Majority and Christian Political Action Committees, to provide a point of analogy.

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