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Published by: Harvard Kennedy School
Published in: 1983
Length: 20 pages
Notes: For terms & conditions go to www.thecasecentre.org/freecaseterms

Abstract

On October 23, 1981, the head of the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration announced that it was rescinding regulations that would have required the installation of passive restraint systems in all automobiles, beginning with model year 1984. Eight months later, a federal judge ordered NHTSA to reconsider, arguing that the agency 'drew conclusions that were unsupported by evidence on the record and then artificially narrowed the range of alternatives available to it under its legislative mandate'.

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Abstract

On October 23, 1981, the head of the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration announced that it was rescinding regulations that would have required the installation of passive restraint systems in all automobiles, beginning with model year 1984. Eight months later, a federal judge ordered NHTSA to reconsider, arguing that the agency 'drew conclusions that were unsupported by evidence on the record and then artificially narrowed the range of alternatives available to it under its legislative mandate'.

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